HISTORIC
NEW HARMONY

 

 

New Harmony was the site of two early American utopian communities. The Harmonie Society, a group of German dissenters led by George Rapp, arrived in the United States in 1804, settling in Pennsylvania. 10 years later the Harmonists purchased 20,000 acres on the Wabash River, and moved to Indiana in 1814.

Historic New Harmony

 

New Harmony was the site of two early American utopian communities. The Harmonie Society, a group of German dissenters led by George Rapp, arrived in the United States in 1804, settling in Pennsylvania. 10 years later the Harmonists purchased 20,000 acres on the Wabash River, and moved to Indiana in 1814.

The Harmonists believed that Christ’s second coming was imminent. They pursued Christian perfection through every aspect of their daily conduct, and created a highly ordered and productive community.

Between 1814 and 1824 the Harmonists constructed more than 180 log, frame and brick structures. The community was entirely self-sufficient and produced a wide variety of goods that were traded as far away as New Orleans, Pittsburgh and even overseas.

In 1824, George Rapp decided to sell New Harmony. He found a buyer in Robert Owen, a wealthy industrialist from Scotland. In 1825, with his business partner William Maclure, Owen purchased New Harmony outright, hoping to establish a model community where education and social equality would flourish. Maclure, a well-respected amateur geologist, attracted many important scholars to New Harmony, including naturalists, geologists, educators, and early feminists.

Owen’s “Community of Equality,” had dissolved by 1827. Nevertheless, his utopian dream brought significant contributions to American scientific and educational theory, study and practice. Early feminist activity increased national awareness of the women’s suffrage issue.

Today the state’s properties are administered in a joint program with the University of Southern Indiana called Historic New Harmony, and include the Labyrinth, Community House No. 2, Thrall’s Opera House, the Scholle House, the Fauntleroy Home, Redbud Park and the Harmonist Labyrinth."

 

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VISIT

HISTORIC NEW HARMONY

 

HOURS

The Atheneum is open year-round!
Daily, 9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Closed: Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year's Eve and New Year's Day. 

Historic New Harmony observes Central Daylight Savings Time. 

 

TICKETS 
Adults $18
Seniors/AAA Members $15
Children 7-17 $5
Children under 7 FREE
Family Ticket (members residing in the same household) $30

 

Tours are at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. daily and begin at the Atheneum/Visitors Center, located at the corner of North and Arthur Streets.

The Atheneum/Visitors Center is open daily from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., but during November and December the walking tour is only available on the weekends (Saturday and Sunday) at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Group/School Tours: Contact MeLissa Williams, Visitor Services Coordinator, at mjwilliams2@usi.edu or 800.231.2168 for group tour rates.

Address:
Historic New Harmony
P.O. Box 579
New Harmony, IN 47631

Phone: 800.231.2168

Fax: 812.682.4313

E-mail: harmony@usi.edu

 
DIRECTIONS 

Historic New Harmony is 40 minutes drive time west of Evansville and is located on Indiana 66. From I-64, take exit 4 to Indiana 69 South and Indiana 66 West. 
Map

 

 

 

Rental Information

 

Community House No. 2
Perfect for gatherings, the feast room features long tables and benches for meetings or meals. The third floor’s exposed bricks and beams create a cozy loft atmosphere.


Fauntleroy Home
The lovely grounds to this New Harmony landmark provide a picturesque setting for weddings and parties. The nearby weathered barn is a popular backdrop for photos.


Harmonist Labyrinth
Planted in concentric circles of manicured privet hedge, this reconstructed Harmonist labyrinth evokes the serenity and peacefulness the Utopians were seeking. Perfect for garden parties and weddings.


Redbud Park
Named for the colorful redbud trees that bloom in the spring, Redbud Park is located in downtown New Harmony.


Thrall’s Opera House
Originally built by the Harmonists as a communal dormitory, the building was converted to a Victorian theatre in the mid 19th century. Beautifully restored to its Victorian elegance. Ideal for weddings, receptions, reunions, concerts, meetings, and conferences.

For rental information email Chris Laughbaum or call 812.682.3050.

 

Perfect for garden parties and weddings